red wine, coffee and aspirin can prevent cancer?

Can aspirin prevent cancer? Add exercise, red wine and coffee.

Can aspirin prevent cancer?  And red wine and coffee?  First the aspirin.  The simple answer is yes.  Aspirin can prevent cancer. Aspirin reduces the risk that you, or someone you care about, will get cancer.  As of last October, aspirin is recommended for prevention of both cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer.  A new study published this month found supports that view and found another benefit of aspirin. Aspirin reduces risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.  Aspirin also reduces overall risk of cancer.  Can aspirin prevent cancer of all types?  Unfortunately, aspirin did not reduce risk of lung cancer or breast or prostate cancer.

How much aspirin do I need to reduce risk of cancer?

Aspirin prevent cancer? Read on. Mens Athletic shirt, crossfit shirt, kettlebell shirt

Awesome cool mens Eye Pood Kettlebell Shirt by WODMasters.

Lower cancer rates were seen in people who regularly took 1/2 to 1 and 1/2 regular sized aspirin tablets a week.  That’s not that much, but aspirin needed to have been taken for about six years before the effect was noticeable.   For people over 50, the researchers estimated that taking regular low-dose aspirin could prevent 10s of thousands of cancers a year.  The study used data from 135,965 regular aspirin users.  A lot of people and a lot of data allowed the researchers to make some pretty strong conclusions.

How does taking aspirin prevent cancer

It is thought that aspirin prevents cancer by reducing inflammation.  While inflammation can help speed recovery from infections it can also damage our cells.

Colorectal cancer sounds nasty.  What else can I do to reduce risk?

Risk for cancer goes up with age.  Not much you can do about that.  And some people may be at increased risk because of genetics.  African Americans and Ashkenazi Jews are more likely to get it.  But there are some things you can control.  Risk factors for colorectal cancer include:

  • heavy drinking (just when we were starting to get into bourbon!)
  • a diet high in red meat, especially if you like to cook it at high temperature (sorry Paleo friends, but that is what most of the research says).
  • processed meats (hot dogs, spam, etc., but those are gross.  No loss there.)
  • infection with human papilloma virus (HPV)
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Some things that can reduce risk of colorectal and gastrointestinal cancers are:

  • aspirin
  • mediterranean diet
  • regular exercise
  • healthy weight
  • maybe coffee
  • possibly red wine

Does this mean I can take aspirin, drink wine and coffee and not get a colonoscopy?

No.  You should still get screened for colorectal cancer if you are over 50.  Talk to your physician.  Sometimes the right lighting and music can help with any discomfort you might feel.  A glass of red wine might just complete the experience.

Conclusions and Relevance

Long-term aspirin use was associated with a modest, reduced risk for overall cancer.  Half to one and a half aspirin tablets daily for six years showed an especially reduced risk of gastrointestinal tumors. Regular aspirin use may prevent colorectal cancers and complement the benefits of screening.  Avoiding red meat and high cooking temperatures may help.  Drinking coffee and red wine might also reduce risk of colorectal cancer.

Read more.

Kontou N, Psaltopoulou T, Soupos N, Polychronopoulos E, Xinopoulos D, Linos A, Panagiotakos D.  2012.  Alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer in a Mediterranean population: a case-control study.  Dis Colon Rectum.  55(6): 703-10.  

Nakamura T, Ishikawa H, Mutoh M, Wakabayashi K, Kawano A, Sakai T, Matsuura N.  2015.  Coffee prevents proximal colorectal adenomas in Japanese men: a prospective cohort study.  Eur J Cancer Prev. 2015 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print]

Tarraga-Lopez PJ, Albero JS, Rodriguez-Montes JA.  2014.  Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer.  Coin Med Insights Gastroenterol.  7:33-46.  

Caffeine Timing Crossfit Team Training for the crossfit open wod 14.3

Caffeine Timing, Time of Day and Athletic Performance

Summary: athletic performance is generally better in the afternoon than in the morning.  Caffeine timing may be important.  Caffeine levels peak in the blood stream 30-60 minutes after ingestion.  Muscles are more responsive to caffeine in the afternoon over morning.  Caffeine abstinence before-hand gives stronger effect.

Compete, if possible, in the afternoon over the morning.

Keep Austin Weirdfest 5K CrossFit Seven Athlete prepares for the event.

CrossFit Seven Athlete waits for his event. He’d look better in a WODMASTERS shirt

Athletes perform better in the afternoon and early evening than in the morning. This is the case for weightlifting as well as for endurance exercise like running, swimming and cycling.  Even penmanship is less precise in the morning.  Possibly it’s a warm up issue.  But it looks like a circadian rhythm issue too.  The circadian rhythm is an internal clock that regulates what you do during a day.  It regulates sleeping patterns.   Also body temperature, hormones and fluid regulation. Muscle response to stimulation is stronger in late afternoon.  A 2012 study (Mora-Rodriguez et al.) looked at electrically-induced response in weight lifters.  And they looked at voluntary contraction too, comparing morning and afternoon response.  All weightlifters were men.  All were described as highly trained elite weightlifters. The weightlifters lived in a research facility and were denied caffeine for 4 days before testing.  (That must have been tough.) The study also compared voluntary and electrically induced response in the morning with and without caffeine.  If you are wondering “what is caffeine” get some coffee.  Lifters were given caffeine on a body weight basis.  Caffeine was taken 60 minutes before performance testing.

Study Details: Caffeine Timing, Weightlifting and Performance.

  • Test times were at 10:00 am and 6:00 PM.  Caffeine intake was 3mg per kg.  (if you weigh 80kg.  that’s about 240 mg or  about one 12 ounce cup of extremely strong starbucks style coffee.)  Caffeine was taken 45 minutes before lifting.
  • Morning performance vs. evening performance
  • Morning performance with Caffeine supplement vs. Placebo.

Caffeine Timing  Results

Strength and power output with placebo was better in the evening by 3% to 7.5% over morning strength and power output.   Caffeine in the morning increased strength and power output by 4.6% to 5.7% for squats when compared to no morning caffeine.  Electrically invoked response increased by 14.6% and nerve activation jumped 96.8%.  Squats seemed to be more caffeine dependent than bench press.  Maybe mornings are just meant to be spent drinking coffee.

If you are doing Crossfit Open competitions:

This site started as a site for Crossfit Masters Athletes, so here is the info for Crossfit readers:  For people trying to qualify for regionals or the CrossFit Games 2013 this could be important.  Do your Open CrossFit WOD’s in the afternoon.   If you can.  Caffeine in the morning will get your muscles up to the level they’d be if you did your workout in the afternoon.  So when you are competing during a morning WOD, have some coffee 45 minutes before the event.  And don’t forget the four days of abstinence before hand.Last note: caffeine peaks in your blood stream 30-60 minutes after its taken.

  • Abstain from coffee for 4 days before your event
  • Drink Coffee 30-45 minutes before you start
  • Do your event in the afternoon if possible

Note: Tablet or pure caffeine may not give the same results as coffee.

The study discussed here was of the effects of caffeine on athletic performance.  Coffee may provide additional benefits.  You can read more about the effects of coffee vs caffeine here.

Mora-Rodríguez R, García Pallarés J, López-Samanes Á, Ortega JF, & Fernández-Elías VE (2012). Caffeine ingestion reverses the circadian rhythm effects on neuromuscular performance in highly resistance-trained men. PloS one, 7 (4) PMID: 22496767

Bruno runs with caffeine coffee Lucas wishes he had some too

Caffeine Coffee and Timing for performance and competition

Caffeine Coffee Tea (Coke?).  First we’ll start off talking about the importance of time of day in athletic performance.

Compete, if possible, in the afternoon over the morning.

Keep Austin Weirdfest 5K CrossFit Seven Athlete prepares for the event.

CrossFit Seven Athlete waits for his event. He’d look better in a WODMASTERS shirt

Athletes perform better in the afternoon and early evening than in the morning.This is the case for weightlifting as well as for endurance exercise like running, swimming and cycling.  Even penmanship is less precise in the morning.  Possibly it’s a warm up issue.  But it looks like a circadian rhythm issue too.  The circadian rhythm is an internal clock that regulates what you do during a day.  It regulates sleeping patterns.   Also body temperature, hormones and fluid regulation. Muscle response to stimulation is stronger in late afternoon.  A 2012 study (Mora-Rodriguez et al.) looked at electrically-induced response in weight lifters.  And they looked at voluntary contraction too, comparing morning and afternoon response.  All weightlifters were men.  All were described as highly trained elite weightlifters. The weightlifters lived in a research facility and were denied caffeine for 4 days before testing.  (That must have been tough.) The study also compared voluntary and electrically induced response in the morning with and without caffeine.  If you are wondering “what is caffeine” get some coffee.  Lifters were given caffeine on a body weight basis.  Caffeine was taken 60 minutes before performance testing.

Study Details: Caffeine, Weightlifting and Performance.

  • Test times were at 10:00 am and 6:00 PM.  Caffeine intake was 3mg per kg.  (if you weigh 80kg.  that’s about 240 mg or  about one 12 ounce cup of extremely strong starbucks style coffee.)  Caffeine was taken 45 minutes before lifting.
  • Morning performance vs. evening performance
  • Morning performance with Caffeine supplement vs. Placebo.

Results

Mother and daughter at Crossfit Seven in Fort Worth, TX.  Caffeine Coffee?  You bet.

Mother and daughter at Crossfit Seven in Fort Worth, TX. Caffeine Coffee? You bet.

Strength and power output with placebo was better in the evening by 3% to 7.5% over morning strength and power output.   Caffeine in the morning increased strength and power output by 4.6% to 5.7% for squats when compared to no morning caffeine.  Electrically invoked response increased by 14.6% and nerve activation jumped 96.8%.  Squats seemed to be more caffeine dependent than bench press.  Maybe mornings are just meant to be spent drinking coffee.

If you are doing Crossfit Open competitions:

This site started as a site for Crossfit Masters Athletes, so here is the info for Crossfit readers:  For people trying to qualify for regionals or the CrossFit Games 2013 this could be important.  Do your Open CrossFit WOD’s in the afternoon.   If you can.  Caffeine in the morning will get your muscles up to the level they’d be if you did your workout in the afternoon.  So when you are competing during a morning WOD, have some coffee 45 minutes before the event.  And don’t forget the four days of abstinence before hand.Last note: caffeine peaks in your blood stream 30-60 minutes after its taken.

  • Abstain from coffee for 4 days before your event
  • Drink Coffee 30-45 minutes before you start
  • Do your event in the afternoon if possible

Note: Tablet or pure caffeine Coffee may not give the same results:

You can read more about the effects of coffee vs caffeine here.

Mora-Rodríguez R, García Pallarés J, López-Samanes Á, Ortega JF, & Fernández-Elías VE (2012). Caffeine ingestion reverses the circadian rhythm effects on neuromuscular performance in highly resistance-trained men. PloS one, 7 (4) PMID: 22496767